Effects of insulin and insulin-like growth factors on cultured human hair follicles: IGF-I at physiologic concentrations is an important regulator of hair follicle growth in vitro.

Source

Department of Clinical Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Addenbrookes Hospital, U.K.

Abstract

Insulin stimulated hair follicle growth in a dose-dependent manner over the range of 0.01 to 100 micrograms/ml. Maximum rates of hair follicle growth were observed when follicles were maintained in medium containing 10 micrograms/ml insulin, which is supraphysiologic. Hair follicles maintained in the absence of insulin or at physiologic levels showed premature entry into a catagen-like state. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and -II had no significant effect on hair follicle growth when maintained in the presence of 10 micrograms/ml insulin. However, in the absence of insulin, both IGF-I (0.01-100 ng/ml) and IGF-II (0.01-100 ng/ml) stimulated hair follicle growth in a dose-dependent manner. IGF-I was more potent than either insulin or IGF-II, stimulating maximum rates of hair follicle growth at 10 ng/ml, whereas IGF-II gave maximum stimulation at 100 ng/ml. The rates of hair follicle growth stimulated by 10 ng/ml IGF-I were identical to those stimulated by 10 micrograms/ml insulin. IGF-II (100 ng/ml), however, was unable to stimulate hair follicle growth to the same extent as insulin. Both IGF-I (10 ng/ml) and IGF-II (100 ng/ml) were more potent than insulin at preventing hair follicles from entering into a catagen-like state. Growth hormone had no effect on hair follicle growth or morphology in the absence of insulin. These data suggest that in vitro IGF-I may be an important physiologic regulator of hair growth and possibly the hair growth cycle. Moreover, the removal of insulin from tissue culture medium may be a useful method of generating large numbers of catagen hair follicles for further in vitro studies.

PMID:
8006448
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Advertisements